ANIMATION: WALK CYCLE AND RUN CYCLE - Key Poses

WALK CYCLE

With a walk cycle one foot should always remain in contact with the ground.

WALK CYCLE FRAME 1: CONTACT (right foot forward, left foot back)

In a conventional walk, arms are always opposite to the legs, to give balance and momentum. Right foot forward, left arm forward.


WALK CYCLE FRAME 2: GOING DOWN


The right leg bends, absorbing the force of the motion.


WALK CYCLE FRAME 3: PASSING

The right leg is in the middle and almost straight and the pelvis, body and head are slightly raised.

WALK CYCLE FRAME 4: GOING UP

The right foot pushes the pelvis, the body, and head to their highest position.


WALK CYCLE FRAME 5: CONTACT (Left foot forward, right foot back)



WALK CYCLE FRAME 6: GOING DOWN



WALK CYCLE FRAME 7: PASSING



WALK CYCLE FRAME 8: GOING UP



WALK CYCLE IN MOTION:



RUN CYCLE


Whereas with a walk cycle, one foot always remains in contact with the ground, in a run cycle at one point neither foot maintains contact. Applying the same concept as the walk cycle ...

RUN CYCLE FRAME 1: Contact (right foot forward, left foot back)

RUN CYCLE FRAME 2: 

RUN CYCLE FRAME 3: 

RUN CYCLE FRAME 4: 

Neither foot is touching the ground and the head is higher than in all the other frames.

RUN CYCLE FRAME 5:


RUN CYCLE FRAME 6:

RUN CYCLE FRAME 7:


RUN CYCLE FRAME 8:

Neither foot is touching the ground and the head is higher than in all the other frames.

RUN CYCLE IN MOTION



WALK AND RUN CYCLE CONCLUSION


The above keyframes can be used in a basic walk or run cycle and will give a half-decent result. There are many more advanced tutorials on the same subject, which once comfortable with the basics, I would recommend you search for. Try also to adapt the above taking into consideration what differences there would be if the character was young, old, slow, fast, etc. Most of all, have fun.

This tutorial is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Please refer to the license text if you wish to reuse, share or remix the content contained within this tutorial. This tutorial has been adapted/edited/shortened/translated from the original by isasaurio posted on the construct.net website.


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